Posts

Women Remember (entitled Christina Lake in first edition)

  (time 4:04) Big Ideas: Educators are encouraged to focus on four dominant themes throughout their planning and study of the story Women Remember . The themes integral to the story are 1) critical thinking; 2) memory and remembering; 3) civil discourse; and 4) leadership. The following are suggestions and information that will assist educators in meeting their learning objectives for their students. Backgrounder: Teachers are encouraged to read the summaries and reflections found in the book Not Extinct: Keeping the Sinixt Way that reference and relate to this story. Several important topics and concepts are mentioned, such as: Additional information on how this story came to be; inca ʔl ί wm , people of Inchelium; Stories pull people back to their existence on the land; The Entwined Tree – a symbol of home, connection, and belonging to the landscape; Colonial dominance – forced border crossing and exile of the Sinixt, a violent manifestation;

Mom’s Residential School Experience

  (time 2:59)   Big Ideas: Educators are encouraged to focus on four dominant themes throughout their planning and study of the story. The themes integral to the story are 1) the role of education; 2) friendship, loyalty, survival; 3) privilege and responsibility; and 4) historical accuracy and dangerous memories. The following are suggestions and information that will assist educators in preparing for the presentation and meeting their learning objectives for their students. Backgrounder: Teachers are encouraged to read the summaries and reflections found in the book Not Extinct: Keeping the Sinixt Way that reference and relate to this tragic story. Several important topics and concepts are mentioned, such as: Mass graves at residential schools. Code of silence…for both victims and perpetrators. The vigil, holding a candle, wearing the t-shirt…to feel good, or affect change? Education – its role in oppression, whitewashing history, forced assimilation

Rattlesnake and Salmon - x̌ax̌ʔúlaʔxʷ and ntytyix

  (time 4:01) Big Ideas: Educators are encouraged to focus on four dominant themes throughout their planning and study of the story Rattlesnake and Salmon . The themes integral to the story are 1) stewardship and conservation; 2) emotions; 3) leadership; and 4) the Sinixt təmxʷúlaʔxʷ . The following are suggestions and information that will assist educators in meeting their learning objectives for their students. Backgrounder: Teachers are encouraged to read the summaries and reflections found in the book Not Extinct: Keeping the Sinixt Way that reference and relate to this story. Several important topics and concepts are mentioned, such as: Sinixt – Keepers of the River; The Salmon Chief – authority, conservation; ksúnkʷ – Kettle Falls, an iconic place, a hub, seat of the Salmon Chief, southern boundary of Sinixt təmxʷúlaʔxʷ ; Spawning – biological purpose; Lewis and Clark, settler mentality, and misunderstanding protocols;

How the Turtle Got His Tail

  (time 3:17) Big Ideas: Educators are encouraged to focus on four dominant themes throughout their planning and study of the story How the Turtle Got His Tail . The themes integral to the story are 1) decision-making; 2) self-regulation; 3) sportsmanship; and 4) setting goals. The following are suggestions and information that will assist educators in meeting their learning objectives for their students. Backgrounder: Teachers are encouraged to read the summaries and reflections found in the book Not Extinct: Keeping the Sinixt Way that reference and relate to this story. Several important topics and concepts are mentioned, such as: Borrowing from European stories, modifying, adapting; Egotism and competition – a different perspective from ‘I’m the best’; Sinixt children engaged in having fun by learning life skills; The Stick game, the power of song; Honour and pride; Competition – teamwork, a collective fulfillment; Responsibility, equity, and sur

Coyote and Buffalo

  Big Ideas: (time 9:55) Educators are encouraged to focus on four dominant themes throughout their planning and study of the story Coyote and Buffalo . The themes integral to the story are 1) self-regulation; 2) consequences; 3) respect; and 4) responsibility. The following are suggestions and information that will assist educators in meeting their learning objectives for their students. Backgrounder: Teachers are encouraged to read the summaries and reflections found in the book Not Extinct: Keeping the Sinixt Way that reference and relate to this story. Several important topics and concepts are mentioned, such as: Connection with the spirit world; Ancestors – continue to be a part of our lives; Desecration of burials and burial sites, the Vallican example; Respect for the dead/ancestral remains; Sinixt cultural practices and protocols around death and the grieving process; Living symbols of loss and deep inner pain; Decolonization;