Posts

Educators Welcome and Introduction

Dear Educators, We would like to introduce you to the first in a series of instructional suggestions from  Not Extinct: Keeping the Sinixt Way.   Funding for the project was generously provided by Marilyn Burgoon in memory of her sister Yvonne Woods, by the Slocan Valley Legacy Fund and by Lori Barkley.

Honouring the oral tradition, Not Extinct: Keeping the Sinixt Way is a unique publication in that it is
an audio file/book collection of Sinixt stories. The actual stories are available ONLY in audio form and may be downloaded using instructions provided with the purchase of the book. The book itself supports the audio files in multiple ways. This project is designed to present Sinixt culture and teachings to students and the general public. After engaging in a listening session to hear a story, the book supports the audio files with cross-cultural perspectives offering two world views. These world views are profiled in discussions between the Sinixt storytellers and the settlers who part…

Oral Tradition

Oral Tradition: An Introduction We live in a storied landscape. The knowledge that has been here for thousands of years has been overlooked, ignored, or disconnected. This resource unit is an example of the oral tradition based on Sinixt First Nation whose legends, stories, myths, and parables relate to the many aspects of existence and subsistence. First Nations community utilized the oral tradition in their traditional educational process. This resource unit is an offering to assist educators in bringing the Sinixt Peoples into their classrooms and metaphorically out of extinction. The purpose of the unit is to provide educators and students with an experience of traditional, educational, and cultural practice that the Sinixt hold and value to this very day. Variation Aspect The linear frame of reference so prevalent in our modern-day society rarely accommodates two versions of a story without feeling the need to consider one correct, or more correct than the other. Variations in …

Columbia River

Columbia River (time 7:11) Big Ideas: Educators are encouraged to focus on three dominant themes throughout their planning and study of the Columbia River story. The themes integral to the story are 1) love, 2) the environment, and 3) communication. The following synopses will assist educators in meeting their learning objectives for their students. Oral Tradition:
The importance and use of the oral tradition in Indigenous cultures should be stressed. Oral tradition is instrumental in the survival of cultural teachings and tribal identity. The difference between the concepts of ‘we know’ and ‘we believe’ could be part of the discussion in relation to the origin story of the Sinixt Peoples. How do we reconcile traditional tales with contemporary values? Cultural Teachings:
The central big idea in the Columbia River story is love and the role it plays in the origin story of the Sinixt Peoples and the birth of the Columbia River. Other related concepts are trust, faith, commitment, and ho…

Frog Mountain

Frog Mountain (time 9:17) Big Ideas: Educators are encouraged to focus on four dominant themes throughout their planning and study of the Frog Mountain story. The themes integral to the story are 1) governance, 2) the environment, 3) survival, and 4) relationship. The following synopses will assist educators in meeting their learning objectives for their students. Interior Salishan Language:
The Sinixt Peoples, also once referred to as the Lakes Indians, are Salish and speak a Sinixt dialect of the Interior Salishan language. The story begins with the word Kasapi, a word from the Interior Salishan language used to denote ‘a long time ago’. When doubled and then tripled as ‘Kasapi, Kasapi, Kasapi’ it elongates the timeframe to a very long time ago. Repetitiveness creates emphasis. In a similar way the term to express thank you, Lim Limpt, is often repeated four times to show a depth of gratitude. What other words are repeated for emphasis in the story? – hopped and grew Neighbouring tribe…

How the Sturgeon-Nosed Canoe Came To Be

How the Sturgeon-Nosed Canoe Came To Be (time 13:40) Big Ideas: Educators are encouraged to focus on three dominant themes throughout their planning and study of the story How the Sturgeon-Nosed Canoe Came To Be. The themes integral to the story are 1) communication, 2) relationship (loyalty), and 3) social responsibility. The following are suggestions and information that will assist educators in meeting their learning objectives for their students. Language:
An introduction to some of the following words and phrases may be needed for younger students prior to, or after, listening to the story: coif, finery, profound, bramble, lodge, sedges and watercress, lashed together, envy, upstream/downstream. The Sinixt speak a dialect of the Interior Salishan language. Their word for Coyote, Snk’lip, is used in this story with no initial introduction to the meaning of the word. Social Responsibility: This story takes place in a village situation. For balance and survival to occur in the commu…

Whale, Fox, and Coyote

Whale, Fox, and Coyote (time 5:39) Big Ideas Educators are encouraged to focus on four dominant themes throughout their planning and study of the Whale, Fox, and Coyote story. The themes integral to the story are 1) aquatic life, 2) communication, 3) relationship (loyalty), and 4) reconciliation. The following are suggestions and added information that will assist educators in meeting their learning objectives for their students. Language:
An introduction to some of the following words and phrases may be needed for younger students prior to, or after, listening to the story: waterfowl, fickle, to be on a mission, interpreter, relegated, captive. Landscape: Intimate knowledge of the landscape and its natural inhabitants informed the Sinixt on many levels. Rivers, creeks, streams and lakes abound within the homeland of the Sinixt People who had a great relationship with all aquatic life. Interestingly, the Sinixt were named after a fish called the bull trout. Waterways were important travel…

Lemon Creek

Lemon Creek (time 4:35) Big Ideas Educators are encouraged to focus on four dominant themes throughout their planning and study of the Lemon Creek story. The themes integral to the story are 1) circular existence, 2) the village situation, 3) archaeology, and 4) cultural law. The following are suggestions and added information that will assist educators in meeting their learning objectives for their students. Backgrounder: Teachers are encouraged to read the summaries and reflections found in the book Not Extinct: Keeping the Sinixt Way that relate to this story. The authors ask that you not let the brevity of this story mislead you as to its profound importance and emotional impact. A wealth of information is shared in the written text to support a deeper and more informed understanding of this multi-generational aspect of Sinixt existence. Topics and concepts referenced in the book include the following: The Sinixt footprint on, and relationship with, a unique landscape; Thermal co…